Tenses Chart in English

Tenses Chart in English

Tenses Chart in English provides overview of Tense in English with details in table chart.

Present Tense

Here’s a chart that provides an overview of the present tense forms in English:

Present Simple:

The Present Simple tense is used to describe regular or habitual actions, general truths, and permanent situations. It does not indicate actions happening in the present moment. The negative form is created by adding “do not” or “does not” before the main verb. In interrogative sentences, the auxiliary verb “do” or “does” is placed before the subject.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I work from Monday to Friday.”
  2. Negative: “She does not eat meat.”
  3. Interrogative: “Do you like to travel?”

It’s important to note that the third-person singular (he/she/it) forms of the Present Simple require the addition of “-s” or “-es” to the main verb, as shown in the chart. 

Subject Verb Example
I work I work from 9 AM to 5 PM.
You work You work hard every day.
He/She/It works She works at a hospital.
We work We work together on projects.
They work They work in different departments.

Used to describe general truths, habits, routines, or permanent situations.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I work I do not work Do I work?
You work You do not work Do you work?
He/She/It works He/She/It does not work Does he/she/it work?
We work We do not work Do we work?
They work They do not work Do they work?

Present Continuous:

The Present Continuous tense is used to describe actions that are happening at the current moment or around the present time. It is formed by using the present tense of the verb “to be” (am, is, are) followed by the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after the form of “to be,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I am working on a project right now.”
  2. Negative: “She is not attending the meeting.”
  3. Interrogative: “Are you listening to me?”

Remember that the Present Continuous tense is used for temporary actions happening around the present moment, whereas the Present Simple tense is used for general or habitual actions.

Subject Verb + -ing Example
I am working I am working on a report right now.
You are working You are working late tonight.
He/She/It is working She is working on a new project.
We are working We are working together on a presentation.
They are working They are working in the garden.

 
Used to describe actions happening at the moment of speaking or temporary actions and situations.
Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I am working I am not working Am I working?
You are working You are not working Are you working?
He/She/It is working He/She/It is not working Is he/she/it working?
We are working We are not working Are we working?
They are working They are not working Are they working?

Present Perfect:

The Present Perfect tense is used to describe past actions or experiences that have a connection to the present moment. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “have” (or “has” for the third-person singular) followed by the past participle form of the main verb. The negative form is created by adding “not” after the auxiliary verb, and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I have worked on this project for two months.”
  2. Negative: “She has not visited that country before.”
  3. Interrogative: “Have you seen that movie?”

The Present Perfect tense emphasizes the result or impact of past actions on the present. It is often used to talk about experiences, achievements, or actions that have recently happened or are still relevant in the present.

Subject Have/Has + past participle Example
I have worked I have worked in this company for 5 years.
You have worked You have worked hard on this project.
He/She/It has worked She has worked as a teacher before.
We have worked We have worked together in the past.
They have worked They have worked on various projects.

Used to describe past actions with a connection to the present, experiences, or results that are still relevant.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I have worked I have not worked Have I worked?
You have worked You have not worked Have you worked?
He/She/It has worked He/She/It has not worked Has he/she/it worked?
We have worked We have not worked Have we worked?
They have worked They have not worked Have they worked?

Present Perfect Continuous:

The Present Perfect Continuous tense is used to describe ongoing or continuous actions that started in the past, have been happening continuously, and still have relevance to the present moment. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “have” (or “has” for the third-person singular) followed by “been” and the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after the auxiliary verb, and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I have been working on this project for the past two weeks.”
  2. Negative: “She has not been practicing her guitar lately.”
  3. Interrogative: “Have you been studying for the exam?”

The Present Perfect Continuous tense emphasizes the duration and ongoing nature of an action that started in the past and is still continuing in the present or has just recently stopped. It is often used to discuss activities that have been in progress and may still be ongoing.

Subject Have/Has + been + -ing form Example
I have been working I have been working on this task all day.
You have been working You have been working hard lately.
He/She/It has been working She has been working for hours.
We have been working We have been working together since morning.
They have been working They have been working non-stop.

Used to describe ongoing actions or situations that started in the past and continue up to the present.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I have been working I have not been working Have I been working?
You have been working You have not been working Have you been working?
He/She/It has been working He/She/It has not been working Has he/she/it been working?
We have been working We have not been working Have we been working?
They have been working They have not been working Have they been working?

Past Tense

Here’s a chart that provides an overview of the past tense forms in English:

Past Simple:

The Past Simple tense is used to describe completed actions or events that occurred in the past. It is typically used to talk about actions that happened at a specific time or for a specific duration in the past. The negative form is created by adding “did not” (didn’t) before the base form of the main verb. In interrogative sentences, the auxiliary verb “did” is placed before the subject.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I worked on the project yesterday.”
  2. Negative: “She did not attend the meeting.”
  3. Interrogative: “Did you go to the party last night?”

It’s important to note that regular verbs in the Past Simple tense typically end in “-ed” for both singular and plural subjects. However, irregular verbs have different forms that need to be memorized.

Subject Verb (past form) Example
I worked I worked late last night.
You worked You worked hard on that project.
He/She/It worked She worked at the company for 10 years.
We worked We worked together on the assignment.
They worked They worked in different departments.

Used to describe completed actions or events that occurred at a specific time in the past.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I worked I did not work Did I work?
You worked You did not work Did you work?
He/She/It worked He/She/It did not work Did he/she/it work?
We worked We did not work Did we work?
They worked They did not work Did they work?

Past Continuous:

The Past Continuous tense is used to describe ongoing or continuous actions that were happening at a specific point or over a period of time in the past. It is formed by using the past tense of the verb “to be” (was/were) followed by the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after the form of “to be,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I was working on the project when the phone rang.”
  2. Negative: “She was not attending the meeting at that time.”
  3. Interrogative: “Were you studying when I called you?”

The Past Continuous tense is used to provide context about an ongoing action in the past. It is often used alongside the Past Simple tense to describe a longer action interrupted by a shorter action.

Subject Was/Were + verb + -ing form Example
I was working I was working on my presentation.
You were working You were working late yesterday.
He/She/It was working She was working on a new project.
We were working We were working together all day.
They were working They were working on the construction site.

Used to describe ongoing or continuous actions in the past.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I was working I was not working Was I working?
You were working You were not working Were you working?
He/She/It was working He/She/It was not working Was he/she/it working?
We were working We were not working Were we working?
They were working They were not working Were they working?

Past Perfect:

The Past Perfect tense is used to describe an action that occurred before another action or event in the past. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “had” followed by the past participle form of the main verb. The negative form is created by adding “not” after the auxiliary verb, and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I had already worked on the project before the deadline.”
  2. Negative: “She had not finished her homework when the teacher asked for it.”
  3. Interrogative: “Had you seen that movie before it was released?”

The Past Perfect tense is used to establish a chronological order of events in the past. It emphasizes that one action had already taken place before another action or point in time.

Subject Had + past participle Example
I had worked I had worked for several hours before he arrived.
You had worked You had worked on that project before the deadline.
He/She/It had worked She had worked as a teacher in the past.
We had worked We had worked together on previous projects.
They had worked They had worked late into the night.

Used to describe an action that happened before another action or a specific point in the past.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I had worked I had not worked Had I worked?
You had worked You had not worked Had you worked?
He/She/It had worked He/She/It had not worked Had he/she/it worked?
We had worked We had not worked Had we worked?
They had worked They had not worked Had they worked?

Past Perfect Continuous:

The Past Perfect Continuous tense is used to describe ongoing or continuous actions that started in the past and continued up until another point or action in the past. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “had” followed by “been” and the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after the auxiliary verb, and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I had been working on the project for hours before I took a break.”
  2. Negative: “She had not been practicing the piano recently.”
  3. Interrogative: “Had you been studying for the exam before you decided to take a break?”

The Past Perfect Continuous tense is used to indicate the duration or ongoing nature of an action that started before a specific point in the past and continued up until another action or time. It is often used to provide background information or to describe actions that had been happening before a particular event or moment.

Subject Had + been + -ing form Example
I had been working I had been working on that task for hours.
You had been working You had been working hard before you got sick.
He/She/It had been working She had been working at the company for months.
We had been working We had been working together since the morning.
They had been working They had been working on the project for weeks.

Used to describe an ongoing action that started in the past and continued up until another point in the past.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I had been working I had not been working Had I been working?
You had been working You had not been working Had you been working?
He/She/It had been working He/She/It had not been working Had he/she/it been working?
We had been working We had not been working Had we been working?
They had been working They had not been working Had they been working?

Future Tense

Here’s a chart that provides an overview of the future tense forms in English:

Future Simple:

The Future Simple tense is used to describe actions or events that will happen in the future. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “will” followed by the base form of the main verb. The negative form is created by adding “not” after “will,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I will work on the project tomorrow.”
  2. Negative: “She will not attend the meeting next week.”
  3. Interrogative: “Will you join us for dinner tonight?”

The Future Simple tense is commonly used to talk about predictions, plans, intentions, and spontaneous decisions regarding future events. It indicates actions that have not yet happened but are expected or planned to occur.

Subject Will + base form Example
I will work I will work on the project tomorrow.
You will work You will work late tonight.
He/She/It will work She will work at the new office.
We will work We will work together on the assignment.
They will work They will work in different departments.

Used to describe actions or events that will happen in the future.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I will work I will not work Will I work?
You will work You will not work Will you work?
He/She/It will work He/She/It will not work Will he/she/it work?
We will work We will not work Will we work?
They will work They will not work Will they work?

Future Continuous:

The Future Continuous tense is used to describe ongoing or continuous actions that will be happening at a specific point in the future. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “will” followed by “be” and the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after “will,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I will be working on the project tomorrow afternoon.”
  2. Negative: “She will not be attending the meeting next week.”
  3. Interrogative: “Will you be studying for the exam tonight?”

The Future Continuous tense emphasizes the ongoing nature of an action that will be in progress at a specific time in the future. It is often used to talk about planned activities or events that will be happening over a duration of time.

Subject Will be + -ing form Example
I will be working I will be working on the project tomorrow.
You will be working You will be working late tonight.
He/She/It will be working She will be working at the new office.
We will be working We will be working together on the assignment.
They will be working They will be working in different departments.

Used to describe ongoing actions that will be happening at a specific time in the future.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I will be working I will not be working Will I be working?
You will be working You will not be working Will you be working?
He/She/It will be working He/She/It will not be working Will he/she/it be working?
We will be working We will not be working Will we be working?
They will be working They will not be working Will they be working?

Future Perfect:

The Future Perfect tense is used to describe an action that will be completed before a specific point or action in the future. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “will” followed by “have” and the past participle form of the main verb. The negative form is created by adding “not” after “will,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I will have worked on the project for five hours by the time you arrive.”
  2. Negative: “She will not have finished her report by the deadline.”
  3. Interrogative: “Will you have completed the assignment before the meeting?”

The Future Perfect tense emphasizes the completion of an action before a specified future time or event. It is often used to discuss expectations or projections about actions that will be finished before a particular reference point in the future.

Subject Will have + past participle Example
I will have worked I will have worked on the project by tomorrow.
You will have worked You will have worked hard by the end of the week.
He/She/It will have worked She will have worked at the company for 10 years.
We will have worked We will have worked together on the assignment.
They will have worked They will have worked on different projects by then.

Used to describe actions that will be completed before a specific time or event in the future.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I will have worked I will not have worked Will I have worked?
You will have worked You will not have worked Will you have worked?
He/She/It will have worked He/She/It will not have worked Will he/she/it have worked?
We will have worked We will not have worked Will we have worked?
They will have worked They will not have worked Will they have worked?

Future Perfect Continuous:

The Future Perfect Continuous tense is used to describe ongoing or continuous actions that will have been happening up to a certain point in the future. It is formed by using the auxiliary verb “will” followed by “have been” and the present participle form of the main verb (-ing form). The negative form is created by adding “not” after “will,” and in interrogative sentences, the subject and auxiliary verb are inverted.

Example usages:

  1. Affirmative: “I will have been working on this project for six months by the end of the year.”
  2. Negative: “She will not have been attending the classes for the past few weeks.”
  3. Interrogative: “Will you have been studying for the exam all day?”

The Future Perfect Continuous tense emphasizes the duration and ongoing nature of an action that will have been in progress up to a specific future time. It is often used to discuss activities or situations that will have been ongoing and relevant to a certain point in the future.

Subject Will have been + -ing form Example
I will have been working I will have been working on the project all day.
You will have been working You will have been working hard for several hours.
He/She/It will have been working She will have been working at the company for months.
We will have been working We will have been working together since morning.
They will have been working They will have been working on the project for weeks.

Used to describe ongoing actions that will be happening continuously until a specific time or event in the future.

Affirmative Negative Interrogative
I will have been working I will not have been working Will I have been working?
You will have been working You will not have been working Will you have been working?
He/She/It will have been working He/She/It will not have been working Will he/she/it have been working?
We will have been working We will not have been working Will we have been working?
They will have been working They will not have been working Will they have been working?

Summary of Tenses Chart in English

Each tense conveys specific information about the time and nature of an action or event. Here’s a summary of the tenses we covered:

  1. Present Simple: Used for general facts, habits, and regular occurrences.
  2. Present Continuous: Used for actions happening at the present moment or in the near future.
  3. Present Perfect: Used for actions that started in the past and have a connection to the present.
  4. Present Perfect Continuous: Used for ongoing actions that started in the past and continue into the present.
  5. Past Simple: Used for completed actions in the past at a specific time or for a specific duration.
  6. Past Continuous: Used for ongoing actions in the past, often interrupted by another event.
  7. Past Perfect: Used for actions that occurred before another past event.
  8. Past Perfect Continuous: Used for ongoing actions that started in the past and continued up to another point in the past.
  9. Future Simple: Used for actions or events that will happen in the future.
  10. Future Continuous: Used for ongoing actions that will happen at a specific point or duration in the future.
  11. Future Perfect: Used for actions that will be completed before a specific future event.
  12. Future Perfect Continuous: Used for ongoing actions that will have been happening up to a certain point in the future.

By understanding these tenses and their usage, you can accurately express and comprehend different time frames and nuances in English. Remember, practice and exposure to various contexts will further enhance your grasp of these tenses.

This chart provides a basic overview of the Tenses Chart in English. Fore more details, click here.